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Entries in Canada Trade (5)

Thursday
Nov162017

Terminating NAFTA Would Devastate American Agriculture: The View of a Wheat Farmer

U.S. Chamber of Commerce

November 16, 2017

On average 50% of wheat grown in the United States is exported around the world, making trade a vital market to myself and fellow wheat growers. Our main message in North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) re-negotiations is “Do no harm.”

NAFTA is one of our most important trade agreements. Just last year alone, Mexico was our largest export market with about three million metric tons of wheat and is consistently in the top ten. Prior to NAFTA, U.S. wheat was subject to high tariffs and other trade barriers in Mexico. With zero duties and lifted tariffs, exports to Mexico increased by 400% ten years after implementation of NAFTA, compared to ten years prior to NAFTA.  

While we hope calls for withdraw are just rhetoric, we are taking this threat very seriously. In fact, threats alone have already hurt U.S. wheat. When it comes to commodities, if a customer is unsure of the reliability of their source, they will look to our competitors. Mexico has done just that after a trade mission to Argentina and Brazil in May which led to Mexican millers purchasing Argentina wheat. The first shipment purchased by eight companies will be made in late December and will be 30,000 metric tons of wheat as a trial.

Monday
Sep112017

NAFTA's Impact On Cattle, Protein Trade

CattleFax

September 11, 2017

Trade representatives of the United States, Mexico and Canada declared “progress” but unveiled no breakthroughs at the most recent second round of talks to revise the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Warnings have been expressed from U.S. agricultural producer organizations about the harm that would come from blowing up the decades-old trade arrangement.

When it comes to cattle imported into the U.S. from Mexico and Canada, combined is just over a million head per year, or about two weeks of cattle slaughter. When looking at all proteins -- beef, pork and poultry -- to stop all trade with Canada and Mexico would put 250 million pounds back on the U.S. market net. Yet it could have a significant impact on the market individually, such as poultry as we export significant amounts to Mexico.

The NAFTA talks are expected to last at least through the end of this year, with venues rotating among the three nations. The just-concluded five-day session in Mexico City followed an initial round last month in Washington.

 

Friday
Jun232017

Canada‚Äôs Trump Strategy: Go Around Him

The New York Times

June 23, 2017

As President Trump disrupts alliances across the map, nearly every level of government in Canada has taken on new duties in a quietly audacious campaign to cajole, contain and if necessary coerce the Americans.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s strategy for managing Mr. Trump is unlike anything tried by another ally. And he has largely succeeded where even experienced leaders like Angela Merkel of Germany have fallen short.

More than perhaps any other country, Canada relies on the United States, which accounts for 70 percent of its trade. Its sizable manufacturing industry is tightly integrated with American production, meaning even a slight hardening of the border or prolonged trade negotiations could put its economy at risk.

Laid in the first days after Mr. Trump’s election win, the plan even enlists Brian Mulroney, a former Conservative prime minister and political nemesis of Mr. Trudeau’s father, who had also been prime minister. Mr. Mulroney knows Mr. Trump and his commerce secretary, Wilbur Ross, from social circuits in southern Florida, where all three keep vacation homes.

Read on...

 

Tuesday
Apr112017

NAFTA has staying power, especially if Texas supporters keep speaking out 

The Dallas Morning News

April 11, 2017

Geronimo Gutierrez Fernandez, Mexico Ambassador to U.S.In one of his first acts in Washington, President Donald Trump pulled the United States out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a controversial trade deal involving a dozen countries.

Unwinding the North American Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada would be much tougher, even if Trump wants to go there.

That’s no accident. Before NAFTA took effect 23 years ago, Mexico was angling for more than easy access to U.S. consumers, which is usually the primary goal for a developing country.

Mexico wanted an accord that would also benefit the U.S. and Canada, and strengthen economic ties among all three countries. Such multi-sided trade deals are more stable and durable, and that’s helpful when there’s a change in popular opinion -- or elected leaders.

NAFTA has created impressive growth in trade and jobs, especially for Texas. But it’s also spawned large networks of suppliers and manufacturers whose goods often criss-cross the border before final assembly.

Read on...

Thursday
Mar202014

Facilitating Trade at the Border

The Chamber is encouraged by the forward movement the executive order creates, and encourages the government agencies to push forward to complete this project.  Creating a single window, not only creates efficiencies and market opportunities for business, but will set the standard for our international trade partners.  

Click here for complete article > U.S. Chamber of Commerce

March 19, 2014

Last month, President Obama signed an Executive Order (EO) entitled “Streamline the Export/Import process for American Business." The EO set in motion a determined plan to modernize our trade process through the development of the International Trade System (ITDS), which when completed will effectively create a “single window” for international trade. ITDS will be a strong step towards streamlining our border processes to improve efficiency and effectiveness while building our risk based security structure. This single touch point to move goods across our national borders will improve regulatory interfaces between government agencies and, if done correctly, will create major efficiencies for our businesses. Furthermore, the improved trade environment created by the EO will foster new and improved economic growth/opportunities, job growth.

Companies face a barrage of government agencies when they are looking to engage in international trade.  The latest count from U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) shows that some 47 government agencies have a role in the process. In addition to the host of government actors, many of the current requirements remain paper-based procedures that are more reminiscent of the 20th century, rather than the Internet-connected 21st century.  This bureaucracy is complex, and adds time and costs to both the government and the companies engaging in the global supply chain...