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Entries in Mexico and U.s. Trade (6)

Monday
Sep112017

NAFTA's Impact On Cattle, Protein Trade

CattleFax

September 11, 2017

Trade representatives of the United States, Mexico and Canada declared “progress” but unveiled no breakthroughs at the most recent second round of talks to revise the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Warnings have been expressed from U.S. agricultural producer organizations about the harm that would come from blowing up the decades-old trade arrangement.

When it comes to cattle imported into the U.S. from Mexico and Canada, combined is just over a million head per year, or about two weeks of cattle slaughter. When looking at all proteins -- beef, pork and poultry -- to stop all trade with Canada and Mexico would put 250 million pounds back on the U.S. market net. Yet it could have a significant impact on the market individually, such as poultry as we export significant amounts to Mexico.

The NAFTA talks are expected to last at least through the end of this year, with venues rotating among the three nations. The just-concluded five-day session in Mexico City followed an initial round last month in Washington.

 

Wednesday
Jul122017

Second International Bridge

Zocalo

July 12, 2017 

Acuna, Coah.- The mayor, Evaristo Lenin Pérez Rivera, reported that he will be accompanied by the mayor of Del Rio, Texas, Robert Garza, to the port of Mazatlán, to participate in the border crossing meeting, which is being convened by the Secretariat Of Public Relations, for the month of August. 
Acuña and Del Rio, Texas, will present the project for the authorization of the second international bridge, which will allow the South Texas and Coahuila state business competition to be depleted. 

He pointed out that they are being summoned by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, as well as international organizations and various agencies of the federal government, to present the projects for the authorization of border crossings, where the mayor, Assured that the project of the second international bridge for Acuña will have to be presented, which has already approved the location by both cities, which was presented in Mexico City. 

He said that it will not touch the current administration to see the start of construction of the second international bridge, but, it is responsible for working on large projects, which give the municipality the opportunity of greater competitiveness, noting that it will correspond to the next administration , Work in the negotiations, so he assured that he will go to the city of Mazatlan, Sinaloa, to present a solid project, so that he does not lose track and thus avoid being out of budgets and resources Which are intended for the preparation of all technical projects, Seeking to integrate it into the binational Mexico-United States agenda. 

He said that fortunately on our border there is an increase in border crossings and said, that this is one of the arguments that must be justified so that in the next 5 years, can start with the construction of the second international bridge.

 

Tuesday
Apr252017

With NAFTA, Mexico and the U.S. build things together 

The Dallas Morning News

April 25, 2017

Since NAFTA was signed 24 years ago in my hometown of San Antonio, U.S. trade with Mexico and Canada has more than tripled, and there is no question that Texas has benefited the most. With easy access to two of the busiest U.S. ports of entry via land and sea — Laredo and Houston — it is no surprise that Texas exported more than any other state in 2014, almost $300 billion-worth to countries worldwide. Across the U.S., all but ten states depend on Canada or Mexico as their largest export markets.

While "free trade" has been blamed for job losses in many parts of the nation, as of 2014 nearly five million jobs across the U.S. depend on trade with Mexico. These jobs are not just in Texas. In 2015, Mexico was the first or second export destination for 30 out of 50 states.

Read on...

Tuesday
Apr112017

NAFTA has staying power, especially if Texas supporters keep speaking out 

The Dallas Morning News

April 11, 2017

Geronimo Gutierrez Fernandez, Mexico Ambassador to U.S.In one of his first acts in Washington, President Donald Trump pulled the United States out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a controversial trade deal involving a dozen countries.

Unwinding the North American Free Trade Agreement with Mexico and Canada would be much tougher, even if Trump wants to go there.

That’s no accident. Before NAFTA took effect 23 years ago, Mexico was angling for more than easy access to U.S. consumers, which is usually the primary goal for a developing country.

Mexico wanted an accord that would also benefit the U.S. and Canada, and strengthen economic ties among all three countries. Such multi-sided trade deals are more stable and durable, and that’s helpful when there’s a change in popular opinion -- or elected leaders.

NAFTA has created impressive growth in trade and jobs, especially for Texas. But it’s also spawned large networks of suppliers and manufacturers whose goods often criss-cross the border before final assembly.

Read on...

Tuesday
Mar212017

Don’t End NAFTA. Fix It.

Politico Magazine

March 21, 2017

When looking for a model economy, Washington would be wise to look no further than Texas. The “great American jobs machine,” as we're affectionately known, has been the economic engine that pulled our country out of the recent recession, singlehandedly adding more than one million jobs to the American economy. In fact, if Texas were its own country, we would be the 10th largest economy in the world.

Now, with pro-growth Republicans in control of Congress and the White House, leaders are beginning to consider proposals to lift our economy out of a sluggish recovery. But as we work together to jumpstart our factories and farms across the country, let’s keep in mind what my state has gotten right.

Trade has been a cornerstone of the Texas economy, with no partner more important than Mexico.

As our largest export market, Mexico has an extraordinary economic relationship with Texas. Trade with our southern neighbor supports hundreds of thousands of jobs in my state and provides more goods at a better price for Texas families. More than a third of all Texas merchandise is exported to Mexico – meaning our farmers, ranchers and small businesses have found no shortage of customers south of the border too.

Read on...

Thursday
Mar202014

Mexico Publishes Final Rule to Allow Cross-border Potato Trade

The following joint statement is from the National Potato Council (NPC) and the United States Potato Board (USPB) on the final regulations published today by the Mexican government in the Diaro Oficial de la Federacion regarding the importation of U.S. fresh potatoes:

“The U.S. potato industry and our partners at USDA and the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) are pleased to learn that the Mexican government has issued its final rule designed to achieve the bilateral goal of expanding trade in fresh potatoes between our two countries. Publishing the final rule is an important step in the parallel regulatory efforts taking place on both sides of the border. USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has indicated it will publish its final rule in the Federal Register next week. The final regulations issued by Mexico provide the structure for trade in potatoes between all countries and Mexico. A specific protocol agreed to by the U.S. and Mexico will govern the specifics of potato trade between the countries.

Over the next several weeks APHIS will identify the particular shipping and labeling requirements for U.S. potatoes being shipped to Mexico. Shipments of potatoes between the two countries should begin before June.

In September 2012, the Mexican government began its rulemaking process to establish a protocol to allow the expansion U.S. fresh potato trade with Mexico. The U.S. potato industry applauds the successful conclusion of the parallel rulemaking processes, which will benefit consumers and potato growers on both sides of the border.”

The original regulation in Spanish.

Regulation in English.