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Entries in Mexico Trade (8)

Monday
Mar052018

What is NAFTA?

Dirt to Dinner

March 5, 2018

Most of the conversation centered on food circles around the same issues, such as “What are GMOs” or “Where is the organic produce?” Or “Local is better.” At D2D, we wanted to explore the role international trade plays in bringing food to your dinner table.

While you are selecting avocados or blueberries at the grocery store, the last thing you are thinking about is Mexico. Or when you eat a ham sandwich, does Canada come to mind? Probably not. But these are just a few of the products that depend on trade between North American countries to satisfy our food demands.

Year-round availability of many food products occurs largely because other countries can either grow them cheaper than the U.S. or have growing seasons that are opposite of ours. Trade provides the best possible price for the products we want by moving food from where it is grown and produced to where it is eaten. It is an efficient, universal means of bringing balance to supply and demand, and taking the wild swings out of our daily food prices.

Those opposed to NAFTA, on the other hand, argue that the influx of produce from Mexico or Canada negatively affect their prices. For instance, the avocado farmer in California is able to sell the farm’s produce at a premium if avocados are not being imported from Mexico. However, NAFTA can encourage farmers to be more dynamic and versatile in their farming practices. Today, some farmers in California are adapting by diversifying into coffee plants.

Read on...

Thursday
Nov302017

How to Keep NAFTA Dressed for Success

U.S. Chamber of Commerce

November 30, 2017

Textile and apparel executives, and their U.S. workers, are nervously eyeing the ongoing negotiations to modernize the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Concerns around possible job losses in this sector are running high and rising.

If you had read those statements in the mid-1980s, you might assume this sector was hoping trade talks would unravel, due to threats of foreign competition. Some still believe that to be the case, but they are mistaken.

What a difference a generation makes.

To understand why NAFTA helps the U.S. textile and apparel industry compete, you need only understand one number: 97.

That is the percentage of clothes that are purchased every year by Americans and produced offshore. We still make clothes here in the United States — primarily for fast turns, for the military, and for special programs — and we always will. But the bulk of our clothing is sewn offshore.

Asian countries own a good chunk of that 97%. Six of our top ten clothing suppliers are in Asia with China leading the way at about 40% market share. But the other four top suppliers are in the Western Hemisphere, and they include Mexico — one of our two NAFTA partners.

Read on...

Thursday
Nov162017

Terminating NAFTA Would Devastate American Agriculture: The View of a Wheat Farmer

U.S. Chamber of Commerce

November 16, 2017

On average 50% of wheat grown in the United States is exported around the world, making trade a vital market to myself and fellow wheat growers. Our main message in North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) re-negotiations is “Do no harm.”

NAFTA is one of our most important trade agreements. Just last year alone, Mexico was our largest export market with about three million metric tons of wheat and is consistently in the top ten. Prior to NAFTA, U.S. wheat was subject to high tariffs and other trade barriers in Mexico. With zero duties and lifted tariffs, exports to Mexico increased by 400% ten years after implementation of NAFTA, compared to ten years prior to NAFTA.  

While we hope calls for withdraw are just rhetoric, we are taking this threat very seriously. In fact, threats alone have already hurt U.S. wheat. When it comes to commodities, if a customer is unsure of the reliability of their source, they will look to our competitors. Mexico has done just that after a trade mission to Argentina and Brazil in May which led to Mexican millers purchasing Argentina wheat. The first shipment purchased by eight companies will be made in late December and will be 30,000 metric tons of wheat as a trial.

Monday
Sep112017

NAFTA's Impact On Cattle, Protein Trade

CattleFax

September 11, 2017

Trade representatives of the United States, Mexico and Canada declared “progress” but unveiled no breakthroughs at the most recent second round of talks to revise the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Warnings have been expressed from U.S. agricultural producer organizations about the harm that would come from blowing up the decades-old trade arrangement.

When it comes to cattle imported into the U.S. from Mexico and Canada, combined is just over a million head per year, or about two weeks of cattle slaughter. When looking at all proteins -- beef, pork and poultry -- to stop all trade with Canada and Mexico would put 250 million pounds back on the U.S. market net. Yet it could have a significant impact on the market individually, such as poultry as we export significant amounts to Mexico.

The NAFTA talks are expected to last at least through the end of this year, with venues rotating among the three nations. The just-concluded five-day session in Mexico City followed an initial round last month in Washington.

 

Wednesday
Jul122017

Second International Bridge

Zocalo

July 12, 2017 

Acuna, Coah.- The mayor, Evaristo Lenin Pérez Rivera, reported that he will be accompanied by the mayor of Del Rio, Texas, Robert Garza, to the port of Mazatlán, to participate in the border crossing meeting, which is being convened by the Secretariat Of Public Relations, for the month of August. 
Acuña and Del Rio, Texas, will present the project for the authorization of the second international bridge, which will allow the South Texas and Coahuila state business competition to be depleted. 

He pointed out that they are being summoned by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, as well as international organizations and various agencies of the federal government, to present the projects for the authorization of border crossings, where the mayor, Assured that the project of the second international bridge for Acuña will have to be presented, which has already approved the location by both cities, which was presented in Mexico City. 

He said that it will not touch the current administration to see the start of construction of the second international bridge, but, it is responsible for working on large projects, which give the municipality the opportunity of greater competitiveness, noting that it will correspond to the next administration , Work in the negotiations, so he assured that he will go to the city of Mazatlan, Sinaloa, to present a solid project, so that he does not lose track and thus avoid being out of budgets and resources Which are intended for the preparation of all technical projects, Seeking to integrate it into the binational Mexico-United States agenda. 

He said that fortunately on our border there is an increase in border crossings and said, that this is one of the arguments that must be justified so that in the next 5 years, can start with the construction of the second international bridge.

 

Tuesday
Apr252017

With NAFTA, Mexico and the U.S. build things together 

The Dallas Morning News

April 25, 2017

Since NAFTA was signed 24 years ago in my hometown of San Antonio, U.S. trade with Mexico and Canada has more than tripled, and there is no question that Texas has benefited the most. With easy access to two of the busiest U.S. ports of entry via land and sea — Laredo and Houston — it is no surprise that Texas exported more than any other state in 2014, almost $300 billion-worth to countries worldwide. Across the U.S., all but ten states depend on Canada or Mexico as their largest export markets.

While "free trade" has been blamed for job losses in many parts of the nation, as of 2014 nearly five million jobs across the U.S. depend on trade with Mexico. These jobs are not just in Texas. In 2015, Mexico was the first or second export destination for 30 out of 50 states.

Read on...

Thursday
Mar202014

Mexico Publishes Final Rule to Allow Cross-border Potato Trade

The following joint statement is from the National Potato Council (NPC) and the United States Potato Board (USPB) on the final regulations published today by the Mexican government in the Diaro Oficial de la Federacion regarding the importation of U.S. fresh potatoes:

“The U.S. potato industry and our partners at USDA and the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) are pleased to learn that the Mexican government has issued its final rule designed to achieve the bilateral goal of expanding trade in fresh potatoes between our two countries. Publishing the final rule is an important step in the parallel regulatory efforts taking place on both sides of the border. USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has indicated it will publish its final rule in the Federal Register next week. The final regulations issued by Mexico provide the structure for trade in potatoes between all countries and Mexico. A specific protocol agreed to by the U.S. and Mexico will govern the specifics of potato trade between the countries.

Over the next several weeks APHIS will identify the particular shipping and labeling requirements for U.S. potatoes being shipped to Mexico. Shipments of potatoes between the two countries should begin before June.

In September 2012, the Mexican government began its rulemaking process to establish a protocol to allow the expansion U.S. fresh potato trade with Mexico. The U.S. potato industry applauds the successful conclusion of the parallel rulemaking processes, which will benefit consumers and potato growers on both sides of the border.”

The original regulation in Spanish.

Regulation in English.

Thursday
Mar202014

Facilitating Trade at the Border

The Chamber is encouraged by the forward movement the executive order creates, and encourages the government agencies to push forward to complete this project.  Creating a single window, not only creates efficiencies and market opportunities for business, but will set the standard for our international trade partners.  

Click here for complete article > U.S. Chamber of Commerce

March 19, 2014

Last month, President Obama signed an Executive Order (EO) entitled “Streamline the Export/Import process for American Business." The EO set in motion a determined plan to modernize our trade process through the development of the International Trade System (ITDS), which when completed will effectively create a “single window” for international trade. ITDS will be a strong step towards streamlining our border processes to improve efficiency and effectiveness while building our risk based security structure. This single touch point to move goods across our national borders will improve regulatory interfaces between government agencies and, if done correctly, will create major efficiencies for our businesses. Furthermore, the improved trade environment created by the EO will foster new and improved economic growth/opportunities, job growth.

Companies face a barrage of government agencies when they are looking to engage in international trade.  The latest count from U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) shows that some 47 government agencies have a role in the process. In addition to the host of government actors, many of the current requirements remain paper-based procedures that are more reminiscent of the 20th century, rather than the Internet-connected 21st century.  This bureaucracy is complex, and adds time and costs to both the government and the companies engaging in the global supply chain...