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Entries in New Mexico (3)

Thursday
Mar232017

Xcel announces $1.6 billion investment in wind energy from South Plains, New Mexico

Lubbock Avalanche-Journal

March 23, 2017

AMARILLO — Xcel Energy on Tuesday filed to build two new wind energy developments, as well as entering a long-term contract with two existing sites on the South Plains and Eastern New Mexico, adding 1,230 megawatts — enough energy to power 440,000 homes — to its regional system.

The new investment in wind energy comes at a cost of $1.6 billion.

The company plans to build the Sagamore Wind Project in Roosevelt County, New Mexico, by 2020 and the Hale Wind Project in Hale County, south of Plainview, by 2019. Two prospective wind fields in Cochran County and Crosby County near Lubbock, owned by NextEra Energy Resources and known collectively as Bonita Wind Project, will generate an additional 230 megawatts from 2019 to 2049.

Read on...


Tuesday
Oct082013

Oil and Natural Gas Fiscal Best Practices: Lessons for State and Local Governments

Headwater Economics

November, 2012

How oil and gas resources are taxed and how the revenue is distributed and invested are the cornerstones of balancing positive and negative impacts of energy development. Across the country, there are various approaches to taxing oil and natural gas activity, and to spending, sharing, and saving these revenues. In no case has any single state put together a complete package of fiscal “best practices.” Yet each state employs part of a viable fiscal solution and can learn from what others are doing.

Tuesday
Oct082013

Unconventional Oil and Natural Gas Production Tax Rates: How Does Oklahoma Compare to Peers?

Headwater Economics in Conjunction with Oklahoma Policy Institute

August 2013

This report compares Oklahoma’s oil and natural gas tax policies to other leading oil and natural gas producing states. Oil comparison states are Colorado, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. Natural gas comparison states are Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Texas and Wyoming.

Analysis applies state tax policies to average production data for typical unconventional oil and natural gas wells to determine comparable effective tax rates. Both unconventional oil and natural gas wells typically feature high initial rates of production that decline steeply and quickly, and eventually stabilize at relatively low levels. The respective production profiles for unconventional oil and natural gas wells are consistent enough across shale plays to offer a sound basis for comparing how states tax policies raise revenue from these new resources.