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Entries in Oklahoma (3)

Friday
Mar242017

Trump team issues permit for long-delayed Keystone XL pipeline

Omaha World-Herald

March 24, 2017

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration issued a permit Friday to build the Keystone XL pipeline, reversing the conclusion of the Obama administration and clearing the way for the $8 billion project to finally be completed.

The decision caps a years-long fight between environmental groups and energy industry advocates over the pipeline’s fate that became a proxy battle over global warming. It marks one of the biggest steps taken to date by the Trump administration to prioritize economic development over environmental concerns.

The 1,700-mile pipeline, as envisioned, would carry oil from tar sands in Alberta, Canada, to refineries along the Texas Gulf Coast, passing through Montana, South Dakota, Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma.

Read on...

Tuesday
Oct082013

Oil and Natural Gas Fiscal Best Practices: Lessons for State and Local Governments

Headwater Economics

November, 2012

How oil and gas resources are taxed and how the revenue is distributed and invested are the cornerstones of balancing positive and negative impacts of energy development. Across the country, there are various approaches to taxing oil and natural gas activity, and to spending, sharing, and saving these revenues. In no case has any single state put together a complete package of fiscal “best practices.” Yet each state employs part of a viable fiscal solution and can learn from what others are doing.

Tuesday
Oct082013

Unconventional Oil and Natural Gas Production Tax Rates: How Does Oklahoma Compare to Peers?

Headwater Economics in Conjunction with Oklahoma Policy Institute

August 2013

This report compares Oklahoma’s oil and natural gas tax policies to other leading oil and natural gas producing states. Oil comparison states are Colorado, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. Natural gas comparison states are Arkansas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Texas and Wyoming.

Analysis applies state tax policies to average production data for typical unconventional oil and natural gas wells to determine comparable effective tax rates. Both unconventional oil and natural gas wells typically feature high initial rates of production that decline steeply and quickly, and eventually stabilize at relatively low levels. The respective production profiles for unconventional oil and natural gas wells are consistent enough across shale plays to offer a sound basis for comparing how states tax policies raise revenue from these new resources.